Portable Time Machine


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I’m still working out a couple of the kinks in this PTM (Portable Time Machine) but it’s close.  I’ve rigged it so a battery can  jump start the  cathode which initiates the chronal displacement. As for  the rest…well you know, it operates like any other time machine, set it to an open field (vs. closed with positive ions moving from the electrolyte to the positive cathode) and pftt! you’re back in time.  Well more like hummm then pftt!

(above left) a modified 1920’s ‘B’ Battery  (right) The cathode core. Don’t forget, cathode polarity isn’t always negative which works out fine since I’m not going back before 1900.

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(above) Fortunately for me, when these photos got passed around  no one noticed the curious device on my dresser.

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(above) My AEF I.D.  Thankfully it doesn’t list a date of birth.  “uh…43 years from now?”

Time Travel Gadget Fetish

I would like to stand up in front of my 12 step program and announce…”My name is Les, and I have a Time travel gadget fetish”…Below are some very cool electrical…important…uh..things that if they can’t get you back in time, nothing will. My next post will be from 1917…adios!

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(above)  From the ebay subscription:  “….a very old multi-tester for phone company use…The latest patent number I could see  on the meter  at 1901 and a Western Electric Pat of 1917”

this baby has “an old Weston meter, switches, buttons, two adjustable rheostats, four telegraph type keys, a row of rocker switches, all sorts of inputs and an indicator light”.

An indicator light!  isn’t that awesome?  How else would you know you’ve reached 1917?  Well, the indicator light is blinking! Right? And the whole thing is portable.

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(above) WWII Electric current tester. This small (5″ X 8″ X 5″) unit is probably  just good for sending you back a  couple of hours or maybe even a day.

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Or this little hand held TTD (Time Travel Device) where you punch in the date you want and then the gadget does the rest.  Sweet right?

(okay, maybe it’s an 1885 check protector made in Brooklyn, who cares once you’re back in time?)